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Getting Help With Heroin From Christian Addiction Treatment Centers

Heroin, which is a partly-synthetic opioid, is obtained from morphine. This particular drug is an illegal and very addictive substance all over the world and involves exceptionally potent euphoric effects. This is the type of opiate most consumed today recreationally. Christian addiction treatment centers can help people fight this deadly addiction.

A little history

Heroin, which was synthesized in the 1870’s, was used to help people fight their addiction to morphine. Currently, heroin is considered one of the world’s most disparaging and painful habits ever, mainly because it damages both the user’s physical and the mental abilities. Although heroin addiction is being treated today, the withdrawal process can take a very long time.

If the heroin is black, it is called “Black Tar” or “Cheese” and Mexico’s most significant drug trade. Other primary heroin producing countries are Columbia, Burma, Thailand, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Vietnam. Addiction treatment centers can help people fight their addiction – no matter what form the drug comes in.

Ways to use heroin

Heroin is one of the few recreational drugs that can be injected. However, users can also snort or smoke it. These three methods of consumption are addictive. Numerous users first start heroin by inhaling it, then switch to injecting it because the body gets used to the substance.

Injections allow the person to reach the state of euphoria in only a few seconds. When the heroin is snorted or smoked, it usually takes 15 to 20 minutes to feel the effects. The urge to achieve the sensations faster pushes users to inject the drug.

Addiction

The immediate effects are plenty. Heroin slows down the functioning of the central nervous system. The main symptoms observed (seen in case of high doses or doses that may endanger the life of the user) are: difficulty breathing (shortness of breath and breathlessness), reduced blood pressure, and decreased heart rate.

Other symptoms that may occur are narrowing of the pupils, dry mouth, decrease in gag reflex (choking hazard), nausea, vomiting, sweating, irritation and a decrease in libido. Getting the help one needs for their addiction is a must or death could be right around the corner.